Mission


Longstanding Commitment

The $26.5 million Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning is a testament to the longstanding commitment of public and private partners to create a flagship home for NYJTL that will touch the lives of youth from throughout New York City.


Public/Private Partnership

On June 15, 2015, the Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning, constructed in a public/private partnership with the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, opened to wide acclaim with more than 500 donors and guests joining in the celebration.

Cary Leeds Tennis Center
by the Numbers

  • 7,000

    children participated in on-court and off-court activities at the Cary Leeds Center during its first year of operation

  • 6,000

    hours of free tennis court time provided annually at Cary Leeds Center to underserved youth

  • 1,000

    adults participated in various programs the first year, including free play, USTA leagues, clinics, and lessons

  • 100

    percent of Advanced Training Program participants attend college

  • 22

    tennis courts available for year-round instruction and play

Our History

After a decade of planning, the Cary Leeds Center became a reality. Construction began in 2013 with the official groundbreaking ceremony. Working in collaboration with civic, cultural, recreational and educational partners, NYJTL has transformed the South Bronx, delivering on the vision that tennis, academics and character can and will change lives. Since we opened our doors in the summer of 2015, we have done just that.

The Cary Leeds Center provides free year-round instruction and play for youth ages 5-18, from beginners to nationally-ranked junior players. There is also space for educators to help youth improve school performance. With access to classroom space and study centers, teachers offer young people a quiet and safe place to benefit from a wide variety of educational programs.

“Our idea is to use tennis as a way to gain and hold the attention of young people so that we can teach them about matters more important than tennis.”
– Arthur Ashe